Richard Huginar, PhD, Principal Investigator, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Departments of Neuroscience and Psychological and Brain Sciences, Director, Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Co-director, Johns Hopkins Medicine Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Richard L. Huganir, PhD - Molecular Neuroscience

Dr. Huganir is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Neuroscience and Psychological and Brain Sciences, Director of the Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Brain Science Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The Huganir laboratory has been investigating the molecular mechanisms in the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function and synaptic transmission. Our studies of neurotransmitter receptors, including the major excitatory receptors in the brain, the glutamate receptors, demonstrate that protein phosphorylation of receptors is a major mechanism for the control of their function and is critical for the regulation of synaptic communication and learning and memory. Moreover, recent studies on the regulation of the synaptic localization of receptors have shown that receptor-associated proteins—such as the neuronal pentraxins, GRIP, PICK1, NSF, 4.1N and synGAP—are critical modulators of receptor synaptic targeting and synaptic plasticity. These studies demonstrate that the regulation of neurotransmitter receptor function plays a central role in the modulation of synaptic transmission and may be an important determinant in brain function and human behavior.‍ Dr. Huganir received his undergraduate degree in A.B. Biochemistry from Vassar College and went on to earn his PhD in Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell Biology from Cornell University. Dr. Huganir received the Goldman-Rakic Price for Outstanding Achievement in Cognitive Neuroscience in 2014; was awarded the Society of Neuroscience Julius Axelrod Award in 2007, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2004. His expertise is on SYNGAP1 and cognitive disorders is accelerating our mission to understand SYNGAP1 and the biological mechanisms that are associated with it. Dr. Huganir's work provides hope of a better future for all SYNGAP1 patients and families.